How to say family in Hawaiian: A Guide to Hawaiian Family Terminology

How to say family in Hawaiian A Guide to Hawaiian Family Terminology

How to say family in Hawaiian A Guide to Hawaiian Family Terminology

Hawaiian culture is deeply rooted in the importance of family and community. The Hawaiian language reflects this value, as there are several unique words and phrases to describe different family members and relationships. In this guide, we will explore the various words used to refer to family in Hawaiian, providing you with a deeper understanding of the rich familial connections in Hawaiian culture.

One of the most common words for family in Hawaiian is ‘ohana. ‘Ohana refers to not only immediate family, but also extended family and close friends who are considered as family. It encompasses the idea of kinship and the importance of unity and support within a group. ‘Ohana is often described as a bond that goes beyond blood relations, emphasizing the value of love and connection.

Within the ‘ohana, there are specific words to describe different family members. For example, the word for mother in Hawaiian is makuahine, while the word for father is makua kane. Children are referred to as keiki, and siblings are called kaikuanana for brothers and kaikuahine for sisters. These words highlight the importance of each family member and their unique roles within the ‘ohana.

In addition to immediate family, Hawaiian culture places great emphasis on extended family and the concept of ‘aumakua. ‘Aumakua refers to ancestral spirits or guardian spirits who protect and guide the family. These spirits are believed to take the form of various animals, such as sharks, turtles, or owls. The ‘aumakua are highly revered and are seen as an integral part of the family, providing guidance and protection.

By understanding the Hawaiian terminology for family, we can gain a deeper appreciation for the values and traditions that shape Hawaiian culture. Whether it’s the concept of ‘ohana, the roles of different family members, or the belief in ancestral spirits, family holds a significant place in Hawaiian society and serves as a strong foundation for connection, support, and love.

Hawaiian Words for Immediate Family

When it comes to describing your immediate family in Hawaiian, there are several important words to know. These words will help you refer to your parents, siblings, and children in a Hawaiian context.

1. Makua – This word refers to your parents. In Hawaiian culture, parents hold a special place of respect and honor. If you want to say “my parents” in Hawaiian, you would use the phrase “ko’u makua.”

2. Kaikaina – This word refers to your younger siblings. If you have a younger brother or sister, you would refer to them as your “kaikaina” in Hawaiian. It is important to note that this word specifically refers to younger siblings, not older ones.

3. Kama – This word refers to your children. If you have children, you would refer to them as your “kama”. In Hawaiian culture, children are seen as a blessing and are highly valued.

4. Keiki – This word is similar to “kama” and also refers to your children. However, “keiki” is a more general term that can be used to refer to any child, not just your own. If you want to say “my children” in Hawaiian, you would use the phrase “na’u keiki.”

5. Kanaka – This word is sometimes used to refer to siblings. It can be used to refer to both older and younger siblings. However, it is more commonly used to refer to individuals in general, rather than specifically to siblings.

Learning these Hawaiian words for immediate family can help you communicate more effectively in a Hawaiian context. Whether you are introducing your parents, talking about your siblings, or referring to your children, knowing these words will help you express yourself accurately and respectfully.

Parents

When it comes to talking about parents in the Hawaiian language, there are specific words that are used to refer to different types of parents. The word for mother in Hawaiian is “makuahine,” while the word for father is “makua kane.” These words can be used to refer to one’s biological parents or to someone who is a parental figure in their life.

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In addition to the words for mother and father, there are also specific words used to refer to one’s grandparents. The word for grandmother in Hawaiian is “tutu wahine,” and the word for grandfather is “tutu kane.” These words can be used to refer to one’s maternal or paternal grandparents, depending on the context.

In Hawaiian culture, the concept of extended family is important. The word for aunt in Hawaiian is “tita,” and the word for uncle is “kuku.” These words can be used to refer to one’s parent’s siblings or to a close family friend who takes on a parental role.

It’s also worth mentioning that there are different terms used to refer to the parents of one’s spouse in Hawaiian. The word for mother-in-law is “makuahine hoahanau,” and the word for father-in-law is “makua kane hoahanau.” These words indicate a special relationship between the individual and their spouse’s parents.

In summary, the Hawaiian language has specific words to describe different types of parents, including mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, aunt, and uncle. These words reflect the importance of extended family and the various relationships within Hawaiian culture.

Siblings

Siblings

In Hawaiian culture, the concept of family is highly valued and cherished. Siblings hold a special place in the Hawaiian family structure, as they are seen as lifelong companions and supporters. In Hawaiian, the word for siblings is “kaikaina”, which refers to younger siblings or brothers and sisters who are younger than oneself.

When referring to older siblings or brothers and sisters who are older than oneself, the term is “kaikuahine” for older sister and “kaikuahine kane” for older brother. These terms reflect the respect and reverence that is associated with the role of older siblings in Hawaiian culture.

In Hawaiian families, the bond between siblings is often nurtured from a young age. Siblings are taught to support and care for each other, and this enduring connection carries throughout their lives. Whether it’s helping with household chores, offering emotional support, or participating in family celebrations and traditions, siblings play a vital role in the Hawaiian family dynamic.

It is important to note that Hawaiian family terminology often extends beyond biological siblings. In the Hawaiian culture, individuals are often considered siblings even if they are not blood-related. This concept of “ohana” emphasizes the idea that family extends beyond blood ties and encompasses anyone who is considered part of the family unit.

In summary, siblings in Hawaiian culture hold a significant place within the family structure. The terms “kaikaina,” “kaikuahine,” and “kaikuahine kane” are used to refer to younger and older siblings, respectively. The bond between siblings is nurtured and cherished throughout life, and the concept of family extends beyond blood ties to include anyone considered part of the family unit.+

Extended Family Terminology in Hawaiian

In Hawaiian culture, the concept of extended family plays a significant role. The Hawaiian language provides unique terminology to refer to different members of the extended family. Understanding this terminology is essential to fully appreciate the importance of family in Hawaiian culture.

One term used to describe immediate family members in Hawaiian is ‘ohana. This term encompasses parents, siblings, and children. It emphasizes the strong bond and interconnectedness within the immediate family unit.

When referring to grandparents in Hawaiian, the term kūpuna is used. Kūpuna not only refers to grandparents but also includes great-grandparents, as well as the elderly members of the extended family. The term acknowledges the wisdom and respect that is traditionally associated with grandparents.

One interesting term in Hawaiian is ‘aunt’ or ‘uncle.’ In Hawaiian culture, the term ‘aunt’ or ‘uncle’ is not limited to blood relations. Anyone who is older and holds a significant role within the family can be referred to as ‘aunt’ or ‘uncle.’ This term highlights the importance of respect and familial bonds beyond immediate family connections.

In Hawaiian, the term ‘cousin’ is commonly used to refer to both first and second cousins. However, there are more specific terms to describe different types of cousins. For example, a first cousin is called keiki hānau, while a second cousin is called keiki ala.

Overall, the extended family terminology in Hawaiian reflects the deep-rooted values of family, respect, and interconnectedness within the Hawaiian culture. It is a language that acknowledges the significance of each family member and their role within the larger family unit.

Uncles, Aunts, and Cousins

In Hawaiian culture, the terms for uncles, aunts, and cousins vary based on the side of the family and the age difference. The Hawaiian word for uncle is makuakāne, while the word for aunt is makuahine. These terms can also be used to refer to older male and female cousins, respectively.

When it comes to younger cousins, the Hawaiian language has specific terms to differentiate between male and female cousins. The word for younger male cousin is pōpopokole, while the word for younger female cousin is pōpopohine.

On the other hand, the term for older male cousin in Hawaiian is pōpopoha, while the term for older female cousin is pōpopoha wahine. These terms reflect the respect given to older relatives in Hawaiian culture.

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It’s important to note that in Hawaiian culture, family relationships are highly valued and there is a strong emphasis on extended family. The terms used to address and refer to relatives reflect this cultural value and highlight the interconnectedness of family members.

In summary, uncles, aunts, and cousins in Hawaiian are referred to as makuakāne, makuahine, pōpopokole, pōpopohine, pōpopoha, and pōpopoha wahine depending on the age and gender of the relative.

Grandparents

In Hawaiian culture, family is highly valued, and grandparents play an important role in the family structure. They are referred to as “kūpuna” in the Hawaiian language.

The word “kūpuna” carries a sense of respect and reverence, as grandparents are seen as wise, knowledgeable, and experienced. They are considered to be the elders of the family and are often looked up to for guidance and advice.

In Hawaiian families, grandparents have a special relationship with their grandchildren. They often take on the role of caregivers, providing love, support, and nurturing. They play a vital role in passing down cultural traditions, values, and stories to the younger generations.

Grandparents are also involved in family gatherings and celebrations, where they share their wisdom and provide guidance. They are highly respected and honored in Hawaiian society, and their opinions and insights are valued.

The bond between grandparents and grandchildren is cherished in the Hawaiian culture, and the relationship is often described as one of love, respect, and aloha (meaning love, affection, and peace).

  • Kūpuna – grandparents
  • Makua kāne – grandfather
  • Makua wahine – grandmother
  • Mōkua – great-grandparent

Overall, grandparents hold a special place in Hawaiian families, and their presence and influence are treasured. They are considered the foundation of the family unit, providing love, guidance, and a sense of cultural heritage to future generations.

Hawaiian Terms for In-Laws

In the Hawaiian culture, family is highly valued and plays an important role in daily life. When it comes to in-laws, there are specific Hawaiian terms to describe these relationships.

1. Kāne hānai – This term is used to refer to one’s father-in-law. The word “kāne” means “man” or “husband,” and “hānai” means “to care for” or “to adopt.” This term reflects the respect and care that a person has for their father-in-law.

2. Wahine hānai – This term is used to refer to one’s mother-in-law. The word “wahine” means “woman” or “wife,” and “hānai” means “to care for” or “to adopt.” This term acknowledges the nurturing and caring role that a mother-in-law plays in a person’s life.

3. Hānai keiki – This term is used to refer to one’s son-in-law. The word “hānai” means “to care for” or “to adopt,” and “keiki” means “child” or “offspring.” This term recognizes the role of a son-in-law as a member of the family and someone who is cared for by the parents of their spouse.

4. Hānai kaikamahine – This term is used to refer to one’s daughter-in-law. The word “hānai” means “to care for” or “to adopt,” and “kaikamahine” means “daughter.” This term acknowledges the role of a daughter-in-law as a cherished member of the family.

5. Kōlea – This term is used to refer to one’s brother-in-law or sister-in-law. The word “kōlea” means “bird” or “plover,” and it is used symbolically to represent the extended family members who fly in and out of one’s life. This term highlights the transient nature of these relationships while still acknowledging their importance within the family structure.

Understanding and using these Hawaiian terms for in-laws can help strengthen the familial bonds and show respect for the role each family member plays in Hawaiian culture.

Father-in-Law and Mother-in-Law

In Hawaiian culture, the terms for father-in-law and mother-in-law vary depending on the specific relationship. Here are some commonly used words:

  • Kāne kāne – This term refers to the father of one’s spouse. It can also be used to describe a stepfather or a man who is married to one’s mother.
  • Makuahine kāne – This term is used to refer to the mother of one’s spouse. It can also be used to describe a stepmother or a woman who is married to one’s father.
  • Makua kāne – This term is a more general term that can be used to refer to one’s father-in-law or any elder male relative by marriage.
  • Makuahine wahine – This term is used to refer to the mother of one’s spouse. It can also be used to describe a stepmother or a woman who is married to one’s father.
  • Makua wahine – This term is a more general term that can be used to refer to one’s mother-in-law or any elder female relative by marriage.

It is important to note that Hawaiian kinship terms are often based on the relationships between individuals rather than simply referring to a biological connection. This reflects the importance of extended family and the concept of “ohana” in Hawaiian culture. Additionally, these terms can vary between different Hawaiian dialects and regions.

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Brother-in-Law and Sister-in-Law

When it comes to family relationships, the Hawaiian language has specific terminology for brother-in-law and sister-in-law. These terms are used to delineate the various roles and connections within a family.

In Hawaiian, the term for brother-in-law is ʻanakala, which can also mean uncle. This term is used to refer to the husband of one’s sister or the brother of one’s spouse. It is a word that signifies the close bond between siblings and their extended families.

On the other hand, the term for sister-in-law in Hawaiian is kaikuahine, which can also mean aunt. This term is used to refer to the wife of one’s brother or the sister of one’s spouse. It acknowledges the special relationship that exists between siblings and their respective spouses.

In addition to these terms, there are also specific words to describe different types of brother-in-laws and sister-in-laws. For example, the term for older brother-in-law is ʻanakala nui, while the term for younger sister-in-law is kaikuahine ʻuʻuku. These distinctions can help to further clarify family relationships and hierarchies.

Overall, the Hawaiian language offers a rich vocabulary for discussing and understanding family relationships. By using these specific terms for brother-in-law and sister-in-law, individuals can express the unique bonds and connections within their own families.

Hawaiian Family Titles and Honorifics

In Hawaiian culture, family relationships are highly valued and respected. This is reflected in the language, where there are specific titles and honorifics to address different family members. These titles not only indicate the familial bond, but also convey a sense of respect and love for one another.

One important title in Hawaiian family terminology is “kupuna”, which refers to the elder or grandparent. The kupuna is highly regarded and their wisdom and guidance are valued by the entire family. Another title is “mo’opuna”, which means grandchild. The relationship between grandparents and grandchildren is cherished, and the mo’opuna often holds a special place in the family.

The term “kaikuaʻana” is used to refer to an older sibling, while “kaikaina” is used to refer to a younger sibling. The relationship between siblings is considered important and siblings often have a close bond. Additionally, the term “makuakāne” is used to refer to a father, and “makuahine” is used to refer to a mother. These titles signify the parental roles and the love and care they provide for their children.

It’s worth noting that the Hawaiian language includes different terms to distinguish between older and younger siblings, as well as different terms for grandparents depending on whether they are on the paternal or maternal side. This reflects the importance placed on familial relationships and the unique dynamics within a Hawaiian family.

Overall, the Hawaiian language has a rich vocabulary of family titles and honorifics that reflect the deep respect and love for family members. These titles help to strengthen the bonds between family members and emphasize the importance of family in Hawaiian culture.

Title for Older Brother and Sister

Title for Older Brother and Sister

In Hawaiian culture, there are specific terms to address older brothers and sisters. These terms reflect the respect and hierarchical nature of the family structure.

The Hawaiian word for older brother is “kaikunāne.” The term “kaikunāne” is used to show respect and acknowledge the position of authority that the older brother holds within the family.

Similarly, the Hawaiian word for older sister is “kaikuahine.” This term is used to show respect and recognize the authority and guidance that the older sister provides within the family.

Both “kaikunāne” and “kaikuahine” are important roles within the Hawaiian family. They play a significant role in maintaining the family’s traditions and passing down ancestral knowledge to younger siblings.

In Hawaiian families, the older brother and sister are often looked up to as role models and sources of guidance. They are responsible for teaching younger siblings about their cultural heritage, values, and traditions.

The titles of “kaikunāne” and “kaikuahine” emphasize the importance of the older siblings’ roles within the Hawaiian family structure and reflect the deep respect and admiration that is held for them.

FAQ about topic How to say family in Hawaiian: A Guide to Hawaiian Family Terminology

What is the word for family in Hawaiian?

The word for family in Hawaiian is ‘ohana.

How do you say mother in Hawaiian?

The word for mother in Hawaiian is makuahine.

What is the Hawaiian word for father?

The word for father in Hawaiian is makua kane.

How do you say brother in Hawaiian?

The word for brother in Hawaiian is kaikunane.

What is the term for sister in Hawaiian?

The term for sister in Hawaiian is kaikuahine.

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